Friday, August 16, 2013

IF YOU LEARN TO DRAW A CIRCLE



beginners draw - 4 and beyond 
Every drawing begins with basic shapes, for experienced artists as well as for beginners.
A circle is the easiest shape to learn and the most versatile. Begin by drawing round scribbles.
This practice will help your beginner's arm become comfortable with the curve of a circular line.

 
Next draw a few circles to practice.
It takes years of practice to make a perfect circle, we are not seeking perfection.
A circle is: round, not oval, no corners and closed.

When I teach, I call a circle with corners a squircle, as in "Oh look, this must be a squircle... circles don't have corners." Very young beginners, who are just learning shapes, think this is hysterical!

Once she can draw a circle, the addition of a few more lines will make many different drawings.

A beginner can learn simple ways to draw familiar things.
With a few basic shapes and some extra lines, she will be able to record and communicate.

Beginnerswork  little lessons books give young learners a head start with fine motor control
and clear visual expression.
The simple lessons in  DRAW! provide essential visual information for any beginner.
If they begin with basic shapes, children will, inevitably, put their own personality into their drawings, like the variations of a cat pictured above.
Each artist was taught to draw a cat in the same way and yet, each cat is highly individual, full of personality.
The basic information expresses cat, the rest is art.

These simple pictures are the key to a greater level of expression and the beginning of reading and writing.


Create a picture or compose a story.  Pictures in a folded book become a story.
 

If you put drawings a linear form that is read from left to right; she is on her way to writing stories.
Now, her story has the element of time and she can discover the important concepts of beginning, middle and end. Your beginner can also share her story with others using her book as notes (much like a Powerpoint presentation) and filling her story with simple or complex oral language. 





And if your beginner learns to draw a square...just imagine....

2 comments:

  1. Brilliant! This is such a fun and creative way to not only entertain and occupy your child's time, but to actually teach valuable lessons! I was concerned it would like following a boring blue-print, but was amazed at the wonderful variations in the children's drawings! This isn't teaching your child how to trace, it's actually giving them the skills they need to begin to express themselves through art and drawing!!

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