Friday, November 14, 2014

THANKSGIVING


Illustrated...

This is the time of the year when our children study the Pilgrims and the Wapanoaog Indians and their harvest celebration of a first long and difficult year in the new world.And this year your students' Thanksgiving illustrations can be as ARTiculate as their writing.

This packet of little drawing lessons will enable your students to recreate the scenes in historic detail. There are many uses for these drawings. To illustrate an essay or report by your students They can write and illustrate a journal about their lives as an Indian girl or a Pilgrim boy.

Each child could draw one figure and write about it.
For example: a deer and the many ways the Pilgrims and Indians used the deer they hunted for food and clothing or how they planted and utilized corn. How they built a cabin it can be a simple or complex as the 
project.

Or everyone can use the shelter drawings and call it My Home...

Which ever you choose, your student will have all the 
visual information they need to be confident.

By drawing these historic events, children are better able to imagine what it might have been like. Here is a packet of 17 reproducible and historically accurate drawing lessons for your students - from Pilgrims and Wampanoag people to cabins and wetus. 

Simple lessons based on geometric shapes they already know will allow for highly individual expression. People will be attracted to a bulletin board with fine writing and good art and your students will take pride in their visual expression. 

Parents can support homework and Home-Schools can create an exciting in depth group project.



SHORT STORIES...


For higher grades there are instructions for creating these accordion books written on the computer then illustrated with colored pencil or marker. Short stories are a great way to reinforce planning and narrative. Or each child could write a chapter in a longer story the class composes.


DRAW! The First Thanksgiving drawing packet can be purchased as an e-packet at TPT and is a great investment for your classroom for years to come. For more ideas for using narrative drawing in the classroom please visit beginnerswork.com

MY THANKSGIVING


Our modern Thanksgiving is a wonderful and warm holiday that everyone can take time to celebrate together. Young children relate well to the holiday and the gathering of friends and family. Preparation of feasts (great or small) and decoration of the house (grand or simple) are memories in the making.

Spending a few weeks in school creating these little books is a nice way to settle down a class after Halloween and welcome the winter ahead. This set of reproducible lessons will help your beginners draw that special day, with lots of detail. 

"A visit to my grandparents" or "when everyone came to visit" makes a meaningful storyline for each child to share when family visits to your classroom around the holidays. And children will love to read their whole family a story they have created around this special holiday. There are many language skills that can be practiced and demonstrated in this activity. For more ways to use drawing in the classroom visit beginnerswork.com see Tell Us A Story.


The short stories below were written and illustrated by Pre-kindergarteners and were shared with their grandparents when they visited our classroom before the Thanksgiving Holiday. The kids were very proud and their grandparents were thrilled! It was great to see them  sitting on laps and reading their own stories to adoring relatives all at once... a joyful noise!


There are many possibilities for story lines in these lessons. A favorite story has been about visiting grandparents with cousins... playing in the snow, eating dinner, going out to see the stars then having hot chocolate and a bed times story. It helps children create a comforting narrative. This packet can be found at TPT

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

PUMPKINS HAVE FEELINGS TOO!


Halloween is the best time to learn about feelings... this simple pumpkin face offers lots of teaching and listening opportunities. Paper shapes can be placed in many ways and changed. For more ideas about teaching feelings and expressions see little lessons FACES AND FEELINGS. The lesson below is available as a free E packet at the beginnerswork store at Teachers Pay Teachers.










                                little lessons E-Books





Friday, August 29, 2014

BEGIN HERE>>>

Mazes are an important teaching tool, because they offer an opportunity to teach critical thinking and motor planning. Even young children can figure out how to complete a maze with the proper instruction. Here is a series of mini mazes from my first little lessons you can download for free at  TPT.

79 pages spiral bound or reproducible e-packet 

My first little lessons begins a series of lessons for children 3-6, that offer opportunities teach pre-reading and pre-writing as well as fine motor and cognitive skills. This book designed for Nursery, has been used in the classroom with great success. Establish a routine of one little lesson a day and your student will be on her way to mastering important early skills. Each lesson is repeated to reinforce the learning. Children take great pride in completing their lessons and when you work with each child you will be spending important quality time. This series is available as a spiral bound book at beginnerswork books as a spiral bound book or at TPT as a reproducible E-Packet.






Thursday, August 28, 2014

A FABLE - AND COOPERATIVE BULLETIN BOARD

Here is a cooperative classroom activity for K-2... you can learn a lot about stories by deciding to illustrate a whole story... Every one will be reading your bulletin board... 

These e-packets provide drawing lessons that will support the first grade CORE reading curriculum. When you get to "if there is time have your children write and illustrate" a story, these packets will be very helpful. I believe that visualization and pictorial drawing are vital to expressive language. That every child should draw as well as they can write. I hope there is time. They will be ARTiculate!

Please visit beginnerswork.com for more ways to use pictorial language in your class.


Monday, June 9, 2014

BUMPY BOUNCY BALLS

 encore plus one...




Since I first blogged about these balls I have a new grandchild. He can crawl and sit so now is the time... Everything I said about these wonderful toys has proven true. They have become an invaluable. So much so that two weeks ago we brought two outside and the dog ( thinking that they were for him) ate the yellow one and the blue one. Lesson learned... 

So when I saw an orange, blue and yellow one at my hardware store, I immediately bought them. Now I'm sorry I didn't buy green and purple...  grandchild #1 learned to kick and dribble with the big red one. AND two years later they haven't deflated...I'm not sure how much more we could ask of a three dollar toy!

I purchased these balls at different places, different times. I found the large red one at the grocery store and the yellow and blue at different drug stores. They're light and the bumps make them perfect for little hands. Once an ed specialty toy, they are so wonderful that now they're everywhere, even in the drug store toy section...  

At first we just rolled them on the floor of the upstairs hallway... a hallway keeps the ball with in reach, even when we miss. 
We bounce them off the floor and the walls. Great sensory and motor play, also exciting and fun! The balls are light and washable so they won't harm the walls or babies.
Then our beginner learned primary color names. Here is the blue one, find the yellow one... we practiced with the balls.
Finally sizes: Find the big red one, please get the small yellow one...
And along the way: holding, letting go, rolling, catching, tossing, following directions, social interaction and lots of laughing when we missed or cheering when we succeeded. You can learn a lot from inexpensive bouncy balls...


For more fun and learning with babies and kids visit beginnerswork.com and subscribe to the this blog above.... I'd love to hear what you have to say... - Karen







Monday, June 2, 2014

IMPRESS YOUR KIDS! with quiet summer fun...


If you practice after they have gone to bed, and learn to make these simple figures, they will think you are a genius when you form a cat from a ball of clay!

Pack a zip lock bag with balls of Crayola clay in your tote bag and find quiet summer moments almost anywhere... restaurant, park, break from the sun, camping... give a child a ball of clay and ask them what the think is hiding in there... then you can help them find it. 






See beginnerswork.com for more clay play...

Sunday, May 25, 2014

AMAZING MINI MAZES


Mazes are an important teaching tool, because they offer an opportunity to teach critical thinking and motor planning. Even young children can figure out how to complete a maze with the proper instruction. Here is a series of mini mazes from my first little lessons you can download for free at  TPT.

79 pages spiral bound or reproducible e-packet 

My first little lessons begins a series of lessons for children 3-6, that offer opportunities teach pre-reading and pre-writing as well as fine motor and cognitive skills. This book designed for Nursery, has been used in the classroom with great success. Establish a routine of one little lesson a day and your student will be on her way to mastering important early skills. Each lesson is repeated to reinforce the learning. Children take great pride in completing their lessons and when you work with each child you will be spending important quality time. This series is available as a spiral bound book at beginnerswork books as a spiral bound book or at TPT as a reproducible E-Packet.







Friday, May 16, 2014

Become ARTiculate... thinking visually.

Figurative drawing is a part of language development that is overlooked in education.  Elementary students are required to illustrate their writing from kindergarten sentences to fifth grade essays. And yet, we don't teach figurative drawing to our young students, illustration seems vestigial, a decorative afterthought when in fact the student has been visualizing through the whole activity.

In the aquisition and practice of written language, visual language plays an important part and is the basis of idea formation and creativity. You have to be able to visualize an idea before you can write about it. Visual language is everywhere, even science magazines have flashy illustrations to make a new and complex idea accessible to their readers. In order to sell a movie a story board is needed as well as a script. Practical drawing is the expressive language of creativity.

Drawing plays an important part in the sequence of acquiring written language: drawing – forming uppercase letters – labeling – writing lowercase letters - writing sentences.  There is a tendency to skip drawing or see it as stifling to creativity.  Art is generally non objective. Visual symbolic language is conceptual. It fosters visualization and creative expression. There is a direct correlation between writing a word and drawing a simple figure. Visual language is as much a code as written language. A cat has pointy ears and whiskers, without the pointy ears it is ambiguous just a ct means nothing without an a.



Knowing basic visual information gives anyone the ability to communicate an idea.



Drawing is the language of creativity.  Drawing is conceptual.  Drawing can be specific and also general.  Many of the characteristics of written language can be found in representational drawing. Drawing uses coded information just like spelling. 

Preschoolers think visually and can be trained to express their ideas with drawing the same way as Kindergarteners are taught to spell. They can't write yet, but they can draw. They can create books and invent ideas. They can use information. 


How do we teach 4-5 year old children who are too old for nursery and too young for Kindergarten?  They should learn to express themselves in pictures while they discover letters because they can and there is so much to be learned about language, visualization, creativity and conceptual thought through drawing at this potent age. In fact almost anything that can be expressed in writing can be expressed in visual language. 

For tools and ideas for using visual language in your classroom visit beginnerswork.com.
Next: The case for uppercase…

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

BEGINNINGS...

 
Everywhere teachers are preparing to introduce the cycles of life...well some of life: butterflies, frogs, birds and plants to their beginners. Seeds are planted in rich soil and bean seeds are taped to windows so seed development is visible. Every child learns that plants need water and sun to grow. 


Butterfly chrysalises will be found on milkweed or delivered by mail and set carefully in a cage where they will be carefully observed until one sunny spring day they will fly away.

And if the class is lucky enough to be near a pond, well then frog eggs can be scooped up and moved gently to a tank with lots of pond water. Spring peepers will hatch and grow and be ready to be released back into to the pond right at the end of school... this is a wonderful time of the year in every way. Children ready to stretch their wings all summer...

This e-packet can be found at TPT at the beginnerswork store... I think I covered everything you will need to observe, draw, paint beautiful pictures and make wonderful murals...

Friday, April 4, 2014

HAPPY MOTHERS DAY



These portraits of moms are delightful.
Beginning with observation it is a three week process. 
A labor of LOVE: tracing, drawing, tracing, erasing and finally painting with real water colors on real watercolor paper (that much work deserves the right materials).
Once, I had five children from one family in sequence so their mom has pictures of how they saw when they were 5... they are hanging in her upstairs hall.
These children have been drawing all year and now they are ready.
They really capture MOM, the object of every five's love.

for more PORTRAITS visit beginnerswork.com